Great photograph by John Schoenwalter

cole1aI recently celebrated a birthday and I received a card with this wonderful picture on it.  I dare you to look at this picture and not smile.

Posted in awesome, moments

Operatic Audi commercial

A highlight of watching the Emmy Awards show last night for me was this Audi commercial, depicting the birth and death of a tear drop.  Bravo!

Posted in music (classical), television

The Crack Between Worlds

Actually, it’s just another sunset over the Pacific, viewed from the Marin Headlands (just north of San Francisco).

Posted in awesome, moments, San Francisco Variations

Lang Lang and dancer Marquese Scott team up for Chopin’s “Ocean” etude

Here’s a wonderful pairing of the great Lang Lang performing Chopin’s “Ocean” etude along with dancer Marquese Scott’s inspired moves.  A refreshing idea:  taking the music out of the Concert Hall.  Works for me!

Posted in art, music (classical)

Soothing Greenery

Just looking down on some kind of water plants, blowing in the wind, somewhat manipulated to create a loop.  Not that it matters, but filmed with an iPhone in Point Reyes National Seashore…

Posted in art, moments

Be the Shark of the Ocean!

Need a pep talk?  Check out the AMAZING Demarjay Smith, age 8, personal trainer & motivational speaker from Jamaica.

Posted in awesome, personal reflection

Battle Beyond the Sun

The original 1959 Russian film “Nebo Zovyot” (The Sky Calls) was dubbed and re-edited for American audiences by Roger Corman, who hired a young film maker named Francis Ford Coppola to do the job.  Coppola shot additional sequences featuring the penis & vagina creatures seen prominently  in the trailer (and lobby card)!  Greatness has to start somewhere.

BattleBeyondTSun.lc6

Posted in movie posters, trailers

“Molten Cubes” trippy abstract loop

 

Posted in animation, art, work in progress

Forbidden Planet 1956

ForbiddenPlanet.lc1

Forbidden Planet was MGM’s lavish entry into the pantheon of great 1950’s Science-Fiction Films.  The plot was loosely based on Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” (I never read it either, but there’s a recent film version with Helen Mirren, maybe I should check it out).  The film begins in space, aboard Starship C-57D as it approaches the planet Altair IV.  The crew is tasked with determining the fate of a previous expedition to same planet (some 20 years before). Prior to landing, they are contacted by a survivor of that expedition, the scientist Morbius (one of the coolest Science-Fiction names, by the way, up there with Klaatu), and are warned not to land, due to some unspecified danger.  Of course, they stubbornly land anyways, and are greeted by Morbius, his nubile young daughter Altaira and their super cool robot named Robby.  They appear to be living comfortably in an ultra modern house beautifully situated in the alien landscape of Altair IV (sort of looks like the desert southwest but with green skies).  But, there is a terrifying invisible monster lurking out there, which seems bent on killing members of the crew of C-57D (but does not seem to have a beef with Morbius & his daughter).  Also, it turns out, Morbius’s house is situated above the remnants of an extinct civilization called the Krell, and in an impressive reveal, Morbius gives the Captain and a few crew members a tour of a vast (still functioning) underground Krell city which fucking blows their minds to say the least.  Morbius demonstrates a Krell machine which sort of lets you fabricate shit right out of your own mind.  Turns out, that machine, why the Krell went extinct, and what the hell the invisible monster is, are all related.

Here’s an interesting documentary on Forbidden Planet (in 2 parts):

One of the ground breaking things about the film was the the electronic “score” created by  Bebe and Louis Barron (which is discussed in part 2 of the documentary).  Here’s a great short video where the great Sound Designer Ben Burtt re-creates some of the sound for Forbidden Planet, explaining how it was done using 1950’s technology:

Posted in cinema, movie posters, trailers

Swirly abstract water loop

High speed water shot with a Sony RX100 IV, enhanced via After Effects.  Here’s a common weird effect:  if you stare at this loop until the end, when it stops, it will seem to rotate or twist in the opposite direction (even though the image is frozen).  Weird, huh?

Posted in art, personal reflection, work in progress