“The Age of Reptiles” by Rudolph Zallinger

thegreatageofdinosaurs-101This is a partial view of a large mural (110 feet wide, 16 feet high) completed in 1947 by art student Rudolph Zallinger for the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History.  A few years later, it appeared in LIFE Magazine as a part of the “The World We Live In” series which was later published in book form in 1955.  For kids growing up in the 1950s, this was our “go-to” reference on what life might have looked like when dinosaurs ruled the earth.  Obviously, thinking about this subject has evolved over the last 60 years, but this retro depiction still charms me.  I dream that some day, someone will make a science fiction film where people travel back in time to the age of dinosaurs, and find a world not unlike Zallinger’s “Age of Reptiles”.

The Labyrinth at Land’s End

Sounds kind of sexy, no ?  I was looking at a photo essay in the San Francisco Chronicle, something like “…the most photographed sites in San Francisco…”, and the Labyrinth (at Eagle Point, Land’s End, next to Mile Rock Beach) was the only place I had not been.  Worthwhile.DB-LabyrinthA trap for malevolent spirits?  A symbol of the hard path to God?  A metaphor for life’s journey?  A pantheistic meditation on nature? A frivolous diversion?  Worthwhile.

Teremtés by Márta Sebestyén

Some years ago, I stumbled upon an audio CD:  The Best of Márta Sebestyén, a Hungarian singer.  Her soothing vocals and folk instrumentations are a thing of beauty.  Of course, not speaking Hungarian, I had no idea what the lyrics or titles meant, that is, until now!  Here is the translation for the song Teremtés, which was written by Sebestyén:

Creation (Teremtés)

Let’s the man knead God from clay,

Who will create world for him,

Where the man could fold paperboat for himself

and can get away with it the Flood.

Always look for new shores

to become dry.

Always look for new shores,

Until the last tide will wash him away.

Always look for new shores

to become dry.

Always look for new shores,

Until the last tide will wash him away.


Here’s a cool thing:  Google the word Teremtés, and click on “Images”.